Surely you have often wondered what to do, how to create a questionnaire for the respondents to fill it in more willingly. So that answering the questions was not tiresome and the number of abandoned surveys while filling was close to zero.

There are many ways to do this. Some are better and some are weaker, but they are definitely worth trying and experimenting. In this post, I would like to tell you about one very simple method which significantly improves the respondent's experience while completing a survey. It is nothing more than dividing the questionnaire into subpages. It is much easier for people to complete tasks which are small. As the saying goes, "like a shot, in no time and done". Well, the feeling of finishing something, closing a topic gives a lot of satisfaction and motivation to carry out the next similar activities.

A large questionnaire

Surely someone will say "Okay, but if my questionnaire is large" - that's okay. Let's go back to the previous paragraph for a moment - people like to carry out small portions of tasks. So if your form is long, divide it into smaller pieces. In the same way, books are divided into chapters and newspaper articles into columns. Large tasks should always be cut into smaller pieces, because it is not possible to complete one large task in one go. It's much easier to complete small pieces.

So let's get back to our questionnaire. If your survey contains a lot of questions, divide it into pages. All you have to do is click on the "ADD PAGE" button under the questionnaire:

and it's ready! You can create more questions on the following pages.

"What if my questionnaire is already prepared?"

It's not a problem, add as many pages as you need and then use the sorting mechanism to transfer the questions to the target pages. Sorting questions also works between pages, so you can use this mechanism not only to sort questions within one page, but also to move questions between them.

To enable sorting / moving questions between pages, click on the "SORTING QUESTIONS" button:

Number of questions on a page.

In order for the respondent to feel that the survey can be completed quickly, there should be two to three questions on one page. In exceptional cases, you can add more questions, but these must be closely related to each other. If you are using matrix questions, things are a bit different. In this case, it's best to only create one such question per page. Why? Because matrix questions are condensed single-choice or multiple-choice questions. Visually, these are different questions, but in fact, from the survey point of view and from the technological point of view, they are nothing more than a few similar questions arranged in a matrix.

Progress Bar

Dividing the questionnaire into pages has another advantage. You can turn on the display of a progress bar in your survey, thanks to which your respondents will know how many tasks are behind them and how many are still ahead. To enable the progress bar in the survey settings, select the option:

Dividing the questionnaire into pages has another advantage. You can turn on the display of a progress bar in your survey, thanks to which your respondents will know how many tasks are behind them and how many are still ahead. To enable the progress bar, go to the survey appearance edition in the DESIGNE tab. And then check the Progress Bar option. At the top of the screen, along with the transitions to the next pages, a bar will appear, which will tell us about the progress in completing the survey.

My questionnaire is extremely long

Really big things can also be divided into smaller ones. I have never faced a task which could not be broken down into smaller tasks. So is your questionnaire.

At the beginning, write down which thematic blocks your questionnaire consists of. Determine how many questions or pages each block contains. Name these blocks and then at the beginning of each of them, add a page with only one descriptive block, which will inform the respondent that he/she has finished filling in one block and is proceeding to the next one. Isn't it that simple?

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